The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)


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Buy Kindle eBook on Amazon. Related Products. It was one of the largest engagements and a key turning point of the Irish Civil War. Add to Cart. Introduction by Diarmuid Ferriter. First Name. Last Name.

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Weather Check the five-day forecast in your area. Sign In. Don't have an account? However, much of the Brigade also occupied buildings randomly scattered throughout the city, north and south of the Lifey. The headquarters of the 3rd Battalion, for instance, was in the Swan Pub on the south side of the Lifey. Traynor had sent out messengers seeking assistance.

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Although reinforcements arrived from Bray and Rathfarnham, the only I. Seamus Robinson, the commander of the 3rd Tipperary Brigade who was also acting commander of the 2nd Southern Division in Ernie O'Malley's absence, neither of whom reached Dublin in time. Isolated posts, particularly those south of the Lifey, were brought under attack. By Sunday the Free State had taken a total of prisoners. Tom Ennis to concentrate his efforts against 'The Block' and its surrounding posts. He ordered that a cordon be established around the area to isolate the Republican forces.

The Republican position in Moran Hotel on the corner of Talbot and Gardiner Streets was fired on by one of the Whippets, but the garrison of thirty men stood their ground. By p. By Monday virtually all of the Republican positions south of the Lifey had been cleared and Free State forces were increasing their pressure on 'The Block'. By noon most of the side streets that had covered the approaches to 'The Block' were in Free State hands. That evening Free State engineers tunneled their way through a number of buildings to reach one of the few Republican positions on the west side of O'Connell Street, the YMCA, where they detonated a bomb under its defenders.

The futility of holding fixed positions against superior firepower was becoming increasingly obvious. Therefore Comdt.

Traynor ordered most of what remained of the 1st Dublin Brigade to make their escape as best they could, while a token force would remain behind to keep the Free State forces occupied. Monday night seventy men and thirty women evacuated 'The Block', which was to be held by fifteen soldiers under the command of the Republican firebrand, Cathal Brugha. On Tuesday Rolls Royce Whippets were used to provide covering fire for detachments of engineers, who drove up in front of the buildings in 'The Block', planted incendiary bombs on the ground floor, and then sped away.

Despite the fires, the skeleton force of Republicans remained defiant. That night a field gun was brought up Henry Street, directly across from 'The Block'. Around p. Cathal Brugha ordered his men to surrender, but he stayed behind, only to emerge alone with gun in hand.

Although the Free State troops had only intended to wound him, his wound proved fatal. Cathal Brugha was the last casualty in the battle for Dublin which had cost both sides sixty-five killed and twenty-eight wounded. The civilian casualties, however, may have numbered well over In response to Comdt. Traynor's plea a Republican relief force had gathered in Blessington, fifteen miles south of Dublin, by Saturday, 1 July. Traynor in which he ordered them neither to march on Dublin nor defend Blessington if attacked.

Rather, he intended to, " Wexford, as well as to the north, where Comdt. On 16 July a coup was conducted in which Comdt.


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Aiken and of his men were taken prisoner in their headquarters at Dundalk, Co. Thus, even before the conclusion of the fighting in Dublin GHQ had initiated operations to secure control of the province of Leinster. However, it was in the western province of Connacht and the southern province of Munster that Republican strength was concentrated. In Munster in particular, the 1st and 2nd Southern Divisions represented the largest and most experienced units of the I.

This consisted of, moving from east to west, the city of Waterford, the towns of Carrick-on-Suir, Clonmel, Fethard, Cashel, Golden, and Tipperary, ending in the city of Limerick where, significantly, Lynch established his headquarters. Both sides in the war appreciated the strategic significance of the city of Limerick. As early as February a military confrontation over the occupation of the city had nearly resulted in the outbreak of war. Michael Brennan, commander of the only major pro-Treaty unit west of the Shannon river, the 1st Western Division in Co.

Clare, stated succinctly, "Whoever held Limerick held the south and the west. Conversely, if Free State troops held the city, it would serve to cut-off the Republicans in Connacht and Munster from each other and provide government forces with a base for offensive actions against both areas. Like so many other Southern Irish cities and towns, Limerick contained positions held by both sides. The Republicans controlled the four military barracks, with their headquarters in the New Sarsfield Barracks, along with the two bridges that spanned the Shannon river.

The government forces, consisting of elements of the 4th Southern Division under Comdt. Barracks, and Cruises Hotel. Brennan to deploy elements of his 1st Western Division to reinforce Comdt. Establishing his headquarters in Cruises Hotel, Comdt. Brennan took control of the Athlunkard bridge located outside of Limerick and providing a secure means of bringing his troops into the city by manning posts along the route in between. But Comdt. Brennan was at a distinct disadvantage facing the Republicans in Limerick.

While they could muster an estimated to armed men, his entire division possessed only rifles, of which only could be spared for the troops joining Comdt. O'Hannigan who's own division possessed only rifles in all. Brennan, however, devised a ruse worthy of John B. Detachments of men from the 1st Western Division arrived by train at Long Pavement, marched over Athlunkard bridge, and into the city.

Once indoors, their rifles were collected and loaded onto a truck that drove out to Long Pavement, where they would be destributed to the next detachment that arrived. O'Hannigan on 4 July that suspended hostilities, thus buying time for the Free State commanders. Ironically, when G. O'Hannigan and Brennan's loyalties.

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Brennan] had had to negotiate and because he had negotiated no guns were allowed to reach him. Dermot MacManus was sent by G. Upon his arrival he repudiated the agreement of 4 July, though he soon began to see things from Comdt. O'Hannigan and Brennan's point of view. Although he wanted to drive the Republicans out of the city as soon as possible, he recognized the weakness of the Free State position, writing to G.

Although he remained suspicious, Gen. MacManus was forced to accept the need for a truce so that additional men and equipment could be brought to Limerick.

Other Republican leaders, however, wished to pursue military victory in the war and recognized that any truce would favor the Free State position, both in Limerick and in the country as a whole. Sean MacSwiney correctly observed, "Time was needed by the enemy. To gain time they gave pledges which they broke when it suited their purpose.

Irish Free State declared - HISTORY

It suited the Free State commanders in Limerick to formally end the truce on Tuesday, 11 July, when troops, along with a consignment of arms, arrived from Dublin. I believe We never took proper control of communications. There was a complete absence of organised military efficiency [in Limerick]. The government position on Williams Street was centered on the R. Barracks, with strongpoints north of this position in the Customs House and the Courthouse.

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Farther north, however, the Republicans occupied Castle Barracks, located next to the thirteenth century King John's Castle, as well as the Strand Barracks across the Shannon river. The fighting largely consisted of small scale sallies made by both sides against their opponent's strongpoints. On Thursday, 13 July, the Republicans compensated for the loss of an outpost and thirteen of their comrades the previous day by capturing the Free State position in Munster Tavern on Lane Street.

A counterattack was led by armored cars that smashed their way through the barricades on Lane Street. Government troops advanced as far as the Artillery Barracks, but where driven off, though Munster Tavern was regained. On Saturday an all out attack was launched on Republican positions in both the Strand Barracks and King John's Castle, involving armored cars, grenades, machine gun and mortar fire.

However, no progress was made.

The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)
The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War) The Fall of Dublin: The Civil War in Dublin (Military History of the Irish Civil War)

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